Cyber-kindness

Cyber-kindness 1

Cyber-kindness

As the crypto frenzy descends into freefall status and Elon Musk reneges on his total commitment to a Twitter takeover at the exorbitant per share price of $54.20 based on the fake account ratio, we are checking in to something more wholesome. The 21st AusCERT conference is delivering a message of kindness to shape the narrative of cyber-security in retaliation to uber threats of unkind actors. The attacks have left a trail of destruction that have ruined the safety and comfort of the internet and the inherent digital connection that could be found quite simply without fear.

Faster Networks have never written about cyber-security in relation to kindness, so where is the crossover and how can we make kindness a tenet of the cyber security industry? Let’s first see how it fits.

The AusCERT conference ran last weekend and was launched with Kath Koschel from The Kindness Factory. Her effort to see the good in people and inspire ordinary people to do extraordinary things is setting a higher bar for IT workers and cyber emergency response teams to develop resilience to the hackers seeking and exploiting vulnerabilities in software that undermine individuals and businesses.

Scientific research from The Kindness Factory proves that acts of kindness can lead to greater happiness overall and a longer life expectancy. Kindness is the antithesis to stress, where fight or flight reigns. Instead we are more relaxed when we receive or give kindness and we enjoy a greater source of fulfilment that leads to better mental health outcomes. According to AusCERT there was a resolve from the delegates to commit to one small act of kindness everyday.

AusCERT is a not for profit cyber emergency response team based at University of Queensland. They have been under enormous pressure in the last few years and have recognised that cybersecurity professionals need some inspiration and support to build emotional, physical and digital resilience. That support, in the interim, came in the form of counsellors on site, at the conference, that could be accessed for delegates on demand.

The goal here is to make someone feel good with an offering, a compliment or a smile. Something positive that when you reflect on the day you have had, a good memory can be accessed and re-lived. An opportunity to see the world and your place in it, in a different light.

From 2011 there has been a Random Hacks of Kindness global conference to bring hackers together to hack for humanity. This is an opportunity to get like-minded people in a room together to share ideas. It has since branched into country collectives and the RHoK have an Australian arm that try to get together at least twice a year. It is an inclusive meet up where anyone with a laptop and ideas can join in and because of the diverse skill set of members, members can share and diversify their skillset. The goal is to work together to solve a problem, like an environmental warning system for locals living in the bush susceptible to the elements. These random acts of kindness are not only an opportunity for socialising but also saving lives.

Kindness is key.

Faster Networks help businesses protect their digital assets. We are a cyber security partner that brings the best software solutions that anticipate and fix digital vulnerabilities. Our areas of expertise includes Vulnerability Management, Security Orchestration Automation and Response (SOAR), Application Security, Infrastructure Security, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) Protection and Application Pentesting.

Contact us on +61 3 9016 0085 or send us an email to learn more about our cyber security services.